News Clips

Modern Day Rosies: Portraits of Women in Manufacturing

"The Jobs to Move America coalition teamed up with California Institute of Technology for Women's History Month, organizing the Women Can Build photography exhibit. The exhibit, featuring photographs by Pulitzer Prize winner Deanna Fitzmaurice, reveals the overlooked contributions of skilled and hard-working women who are building our trams, rail and buses. Jobs to Move hosted several Caltech faculty to comment on how women around the world are achieving and fighting for equal rights, equal pay, equal access, and equal opportunity in the workplace. "

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IndustryWeek March 14 2016

JMA and Caltech Celebrate International Women's Day

"Jobs to Move America (JMA) teamed up with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), to celebrate International Women’s Day. The event showcased the “Women Can Build” photography exhibit, which reveals the overlooked contributions of skilled and hard-working women who are building our buses and trains. In attendance were Caltech students, faculty, staff, and community members. The participants heard from two Caltech Professors, Azita Emami and Simona Bordoni, who commented on how women around the world are fighting for and achieving equal rights, equal pay and opportunity in the workplace."

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Mass Transit Marc 9 2016

Marking Women's Global Impact on Science and Industry

"The Caltech Center for Diversity and International Student Programs sponsored an International Women’s Day‬ Celebration and Photography Opening today. Caltech’s Azita Emami, professor of electrical engineering, and Simona Bordoni, assistant professor of environmental science and engineering, discussed their experiences as women in the sciences. Alaa Milbes, senior communications specialist for Jobs to Move America introduced the “Women Can Build” photography exhibit, which highlights the contributions of skilled women in industry using Rosie the Riveter as inspiration. Each photo featured a “Rosie” in her environment.‪"

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Caltech March 8 2016

Women Can Build

“Anything you can do I can do better; I can do anything better than you,” was first sung in Annie Get Your Gun as a competition for Annie to prove she could do anything Frank could.

Today, women are still working and proving that they can work along side and keep up with males in the industrial field. To help showcase women and pave the way for more women to work in the industrial industry Pulitzer Prize recipient Deanne Fitzmaurice photographed 15 modern day “Rosies” working in 21st Century transportation manufacturing.

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LA Photo Exhibition Seeks to Recapture the Rosie Riveter Era

LOS ANGELES — Her male colleagues jokingly call her a forewoman, and Ami Rasmussen jokes right back that she's really a fivewoman because when it comes to building trains she can do the work of five men.

The factory foreman and divorced mother of two teenagers is also a photography model of sorts now. Rasmussen, in work clothes and holding a gigantic wrench, is featured prominently in the photo art exhibition "Women Can Build" currently at Los Angeles' historic Union Station, with plans to take it to other stations across the country later this year.

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#WomenCanBuild Exhibits Women In Manufacturing

Question: What happens when you mix a Pulitzer-winning photographer, two producers with a vision, inequity in employment, a history of hard-working women, and some conviction together?

Answer: The Women Can Build project, a collection of portraits of women working in manufacturing, both past and present.

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#WomenCanBuild Exhibits Women In Manufacturing

"Question: What happens when you mix a Pulitzer-winning photographer, two producers with a vision, inequity in employment, a history of hard-working women, and some conviction together?"

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The Frisky June 19 2016

I'm With Rosie

 

This statistic took my breath away:  Half of all the women in Los Angeles County who have a child under the age of 5 live in poverty. How do they cope? What are the long-term implications for their children? How can we change this situation?

One answer came to me the night I attended the opening reception for the Los Angeles-based exhibit “Re-envisioning Rosie.” The exhibit features historical pictures of female World War II industrial plant workers along with current photographs of 15 of their contemporary counterparts who are working on our nation’s rail transit. You can read Surina Khan’s powerfulHuffington Post article about the exhibit.

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“Women Can Build” Photo Series Honors Modern Day Rosies

 

The Jobs to Move America coalition and the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy are hosting a wonderful exhibit called, Women Can Build: Re-envisioning Rosieat Los Angeles’ Union Station that highlights the images and stories of “modern day Rosies.”

The stunning photos were taken by Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Deanne Fitzmaurice, and feature 15 women who work on trains, buses, and for public transit agencies. Additionally, hanging among the modern-day Rosies, are also rare, historic photographs of WWII-era “Rosie the Riveter” manufacturing workers and new research by the University of Southern California’s Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) on the American transit manufacturing industry.

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Women Can Build Exhibit

 

 

Lynette Romero, of KTLA 5, was live in Downtown Los Angeles for the Women Can Build Exhibit. Click below to watch her segment.

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Los Angeles Exhibit Proves 'Rosies' still Rivet

 

They served on the home front during World War II, building tanks, ships and airplanes or assembling munitions.

Their work was celebrated in photographs and posters, and songs like one from the group The Four Vagabonds in 1943:

All the day long, whether rain or shine, she is a part of the assembly line.

She is making history, working for victory, Rosie the Riveter ...

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Entrevistan a Hilda Solís en el programa Morning News de KTLA 5

 

Hilda Solís, supervisora del condado de L.A. e integrante de la Junta Directiva de Metro, fue entrevistada hoy en vivo en el programa noticioso Morning News, de KTLA 5. La entrevista fue en la exhibición “Women Can Build” que se encuentra en la Sala Principal de Union Station.

Una foto de Solís forma parte de la exhibición fotográfica que celebra las contribuciones de las mujeres al sistema de transporte del siglo XXI. Solís fue secretaria del Trabajo en el gabinete del presidente Barack Obama.

La exhibición, patrocinada por la coalición Jobs to Move America, incluye fotografías de las modernas “Rosie the Riveters,” así como otras nunca antes vistas de las trabajadoras de la era de la Segunda Guerra Mundial que pertenecen a la Biblioteca del Congreso.

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A Photo Series Celebrates Modern-Day Rosie...

 

During World War II, Rosie the Riveter became a cultural icon symbolizing women at work in manufacturing. The hit 1942 song “Rosie the Riveter” paid homage to a tireless assembly line worker while government photographers captured striking photos of women at work building airplanes and ships for the war. But as male soldiers returned to the United States after the war, the government change course, urging women to leave their industrial jobs—millions of women returned to working in lower-paid fields like clerical work or working in the home. Ever since then, manufacturing has stayed a male-dominated field. These days, according to recent research, 87 percent of the workforce in the American transit manufacturing is male.

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A New Rosie the Riveter for a New America

 

Some 70 years ago, the song “Rosie the Riveter” crackled over the wireless while a Norman Rockwell illustration of Rosie flexing her bicep popped from the cover of The Saturday Evening Post. By depicting the rivet gun-toting icon on her lunch break, Rockwell hopped aboard the government-fueled propaganda bandwagon that had only one aim: to recruit and train a female workforce capable of churning out munitions, aircraft, tanks and destroyers for a costly, brutal war that spanned two oceans and three continents. Rosie the Riveter did the job, and an estimated 18 million women left the house for the factory (or shipyard) — giving many the freedom to work outside the home for the very first time.

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These Photos Show the Inspiring Women Building America...

 

One of the most iconic images of the American worker in the 1940s was a woman. With her red bandana and a curled bicep, one figure who came to be known as Rosie the Riveter represented the efforts on the home front during World War II to manufacture machinery for the war effort, declaring, "We can do it!"

But fast-forward to 2015, and the tiny representation of women in manufacturing (let alone finance, tech and business) is embarrassing. While men gained 535,000 manufacturing jobs in the U.S. between January 2010 and February 2013, women on the whole lost 18,000 jobs in the industry during the same time period, according to a National Women's Law Center report. Today, only 13% of the workforce in the American transit manufacturing industry is female, according to new research by the University Southern California Program for Environmental and Regional Equity.

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What It's Like Being a Woman in a Man's Transit-Building World 

 

As the U.S. continues to rise from the ashes of the recession, domestic manufacturing is echoing the country’s industrialism heyday, but unfortunately the reflection is more “Mad Men” than Rosie the Riveter.

Gender diversity within the transportation world specifically, in both building and operations, remain persistently elusive.

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National Exhibit Honors Local Women in Manufacturing

 

Central Minnesota's transportation manufacturing is one of the fastest-growing sectors in the manufacturing industry. But for women, entry into this profession is lacking.

"In terms of female employment, transportation manufacturing is dead last," said Luke Greiner, regional analyst for Central and Southwest Minnesota for the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development.

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Memorial Day Weekend Planner...

 

PHOTO: Women Can Build: Re-Envisioning Rosie is a photo exhibit on view at Union Station that features images of 15 modern-day “Rosie the Riveters” by Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Deanne Fitzmaurice. They’ll be on view alongside never-before-exhibited photos of the original, WWII-era “Rosie the Riveter” photos from the Library of Congress. The exhibit remains on view through June 19. Free.

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‘Women Can Build: Re-Envisioning Rosie’ runs May 22–June 30

Woman Can Build is a collection of photography inspired by the iconic idea and image of Rosie the Riveter. She became the symbol for strong and capable woman during World War II, when women began to fill jobs traditionally held by men. The Women Can Build campaign brings awareness of the strong women who are the backbone of our 21st century transportation.

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Solis Featured in Union Station’s ‘Rosie the Riveter’ Exhibit

 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES - First District County Supervisor Hilda Solis will be featured in a photo exhibit of modern-day “Rosie the Riveters” at Union Station that opens this week.

Solis, a former U.S. Secretary of Labor, wears a hard hat and is holding a two-foot long metal tool in the image by Pulitzer Prize winner Deanne Fitzmaurice. Solis’ photo is one of 15 that will be on display, along with the women’s stories, in the main concourse of the train station, said Kim Upton, a spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which owns Union Station. The works will appear alongside never-before-exhibited photos of WWII-era female manufacturing workers. The show is part of the Women Can Build project, which the Jobs to Move America coalition will launch May 21. The “Rosie” exhibit will open Friday, May 22, and remain up through June 21.

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Solis Featured in Union Station’s ‘Rosie the Riveter’ Exhibit   Los Angeles Downtown News   For Everything Downtown L.A.   News

Needed: Modern-Day Rosie the Riveters

 

Some of us remember Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter, her goggles, her uncanny biceps, the larger-than-life rivet gun in her lap. Most of us, however, remember a different Rosie, her red bandana, her clenched fist and her in-your-face, flexed bicep.

Though both Rosies were a propaganda tool created during WWII to recruit women to work, one thing is undeniable: these Rosies revolutionized the U.S. workforce. Between 1940 and 1945, six million women entered the workforce and, as a result, forever changed the course of our economy, politics and nation.

Today, women comprise 47 percent of our workforce and our numbers are growing.

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Needed  Modern Day Rosie the Riveters   Surina Khan_HuffPost_screenshot

6 Images of Real-Life Rosie the Riveters Depict the Power of Women in the Workplace

 

If you think women don’t like manufacturing/labor jobs, you are sorely mistaken. According to a fantastic study by the University of Southern California’s Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE), women are drastically underrepresented in manufacturing jobs, despite finding their pay and challenges very desirable. While women make up 47% of the labor force, they only occupy 30% of the manufacturing labor workforce, and represent an even smaller total of 24% in manufacturing for transportation equipment. 87% of the American transit manufacturing workforce is male.

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'Women Can Build': Re-Envisioning Rosie

 

The iconic ‘Rosie the Riveter’ image that circulated during the second world war represented a moment in history when women set aside their traditional roles to play an active part in the war effort. And while the idea of female soldiers and builders is less surprising or controversial today, a new exhibit at Los Angeles Union Station, featuring photography by Pulitzer-winning Deanne Fitzmaurice, highlights the faces and achievements of women in traditionally male builder/construction positions.

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Exhibición de fotos en Union Station muestra las aportaciones de las mujeres en la construcción

 

La organización Jobs to Move America presentará la exhibición fotográfica Women Can Build: Re-envisioning Rosie en Union Station de L.A. el 22 de mayo de 2015. Ubicada en la sala de espera de esa terminal, la muestra estará hasta el 19 de junio y presentará 15 fotos e historias de mujeres de hoy que han ayudado a construir el sistema de transporte del siglo 21, el cual incluye trenes y autobuses.

Este es un avance de la exhibición con las fotos e historias de algunas de esas mujeres:

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Women Can Build: Re-envisioning Rosie photo exhibit opens at Union Station May 22

 

Jobs to Move America will debut the photography exhibit Women Can Build: Re-envisioning Rosie to the public at Los Angeles Union Station on May 22, 2015. Located in Union Station’s waiting room, the exhibit will run through June 19 and will feature 15 photos and stories of modern women who build our 21st century transportation including trams, rail and buses.

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MetroTheSource_WomenCanBuild_crop

Confident and Capable: Exhibit Features 'Modern Rosies' 

In photos for the upcoming Los Angeles exhibit "Women Can Build," two Palmdale factory workers strike poses reminiscent of World War II icon Rosie the Riveter. In separate photographs, Rubi Diaz and Ami Rasmussen... Click Here to Read More

WomenCanBuild Article

'Women Can Build' Photo Exhibit and Release of USC Study of Modern-Day ‘Rosie the Riveters’ Highlight Women Workers, Outnumbered in U.S. Manufacturing

 

Rosie the Riveter has seen better days.  On May 21, 2015, the Jobs to Move America coalition will launch the Women Can Build project with a new study and an accompanying photography exhibit revealing the overlooked contributions, and decline in hiring since WWII, of the skilled and hard-working women who build our 21st Century transportation including trams, rail and buses.  The new study, “#WomenCanBuild: Including Women in the Resurgence of Good U.S. Manufacturing Jobs”, issued by the University of Southern California’s Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE), finds that 87% of the workforce in the American transit manufacturing industry is male.

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